Page 56 meme

Oh dear. I meant to write a meaningful, insightful post about a little-known current event that I feel is important on a national level. And then there’s the next section of Spiritual Tasks of the Homemaker.

But my brain is mush tonight.

Helen to the rescue!

  • Grab the book nearest you. Right now. Don’t dig for your favourite book, the coolest, the most intellectual. Use the CLOSEST.
  • Turn to page 56.
  • Find the fifth sentence.
  • Post the sentence (and source) below.

Well, I’m going to have to do a few books, because this first one is uninspiring:

It’s a lot like timing the stock market: If you hit, there’s a lot of money to be made, and if you miss, you can lose the farm.

All Over Creation, Ruth Ozeki

That wasn’t even being metaphorical. She was actually talking about potato farming, not “losing the farm” as in losing money on a risky bet. I like this book: the characters range from eco-hippies to spudmen, Hawaiian real-estate agents to New Age-obsessed PR executives. Plus it’s set where I live, which adds a nice layer of realism for me. But not a good choice of a sentence.

So then I’ll try this one:

Now work has resumed; the last of the 176 pontoon sections was completed in the shipyard today.

King of Morning, Queen of Day, Ian McDonald

Oh dear, again. Never mind that the pontoons in question were part of an elaborate device meant to communicate with the alleged alien pilots of a comet streaking over Ireland in 1913, and that this book I found quite at random at the library is a fabulous fantasy with faeries and astronomers and characters that speak in anagrams…that sentence was deadly dull.

Hookay. Third time’s the charm, right?

“He’s proud,” she said, “but he’s not stupid, mother.”

Orsinian Tales, Ursula K. LeGuin

(banging head against laptop) I can’t believe that a sentence like that must stand for this alluring and intriguing set of short stories by a master fantasy writer. But, there it is.

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5 Comments

Filed under Books, Memes, Silliness and Mayhem

5 responses to “Page 56 meme

  1. The Ruth Ozeki one sounds interesting. I keep meaning to read something by her. The other book I would have had to hand (although it was definitely further than the first choice!) was one of Kiko’s Daddy’s manufacturing ones, zzzzzzzzzz!

  2. Mon

    Actually I liked that last one. Invites a lot of questions.

    I’ll pinch this meme too. 🙂

  3. I just tried this! I don’t usually have any books near my office desk, but I happened to have “The Unvarnished New Testament” next to my computer, I don’t know why it on the desk, I have never read it- I bought it on impulse at the library at Sunbridge College bookstore after an interesting conv. with a old(ish, 80+yo) Anthroposophist.
    “As they traveled out from Jericho a large crowd followed them.”
    -nope, that still doesn’t make me read it.

    Then I looked under my desk and there was a copy of “Winnie-the-Pooh” (A bit more my level of philosophy).
    “I saw one once, at least I think I did…only perhaps it wasn’t”
    That sounds more like the elusiveness of my spiritual journey.

  4. lovely meme, and since I went straight from Helen’s to your place, you get the same sentence she got. It is a particularly wonderful sentence, so here goes.

    “O Lady of laughter and cheer, the skies are yours; may the air be clear and sweet and the clouds giving of soft rain.”

    From The Book of Pagan Rituals by Herman Slater.

    Now, if I check the dictionary, which is actually the closest book to my computer, you get

    “Attila (A.D. 406?453) King of the Huns.”

    So there, from goddess to Attila the Hun in one meme.

  5. That is a fun meme. I went to grab my closest book, and it was Winnie the Pooh, which I see Lisa Anne also had nearby, so I grabbed another one. 😉 I’m sitting next to my kid’s bookshelf at the moment, and many of the books don’t even have fifty six pages, but the first one that did was James Herriot’s Treasury for Children…
    “But no, after hesitating and looking around a few times, the sheep turned and entered the pen and Mr. Crossley banged the gate behind them.”

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